Belling the Cat

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  • 30th August
    2014
  • 30

claudiaboleyn:

So if Missy’s ‘paradise’ is a place where all those who die for the Doctor go, then doesn’t that make the chances of her being the Master extremely high? After all, the Master sacrificed himself for the Doctor (sort of) in The End of Time p2. 

This isn’t a terribly deep thought, but it made me think of the Happy Families card game. The boys were Master and the girls were Miss. So Master Stitches, the Sailmakers Som and Miss Plod, the policeman’s daughter. Add in the element of family - Missy does position herself in a quasi-familial relationship to the Doctor - and it does look like she could be related to the Master somehow. Plus Moffat does seem to have listened to fans, and while he’d not give over a female Doctor…a distaff version of one of the most popular antagonists might be possible. I also need to go rewatch and see if Gretchen’s awakening in Heaven mimicked Journey’s in the TARDIS.
  • 30th August
    2014
  • 30

Doctor Who

The Doctor HAS had soldiers as companions before. He doesn’t like WHAT THEY DO, he doesn’t dislike WHO THEY ARE on principle. The whole thing with Journey was a bit…mean? 

Of course, this Doctor is a bit more ruthless. Very much shades of William Hartnell’s Doctor for me - and I loved how dismayed he was to have the hatred in his own soul laid bare. Structurally, though, it would have been a more effective episode if the ‘long dark Dalek of the soul’ hadn’t been lampshaded with the random ‘am I good man, Clara?’ stuff. 

  • 26th August
    2014
  • 26
  • 26th August
    2014
  • 26

The difference in the way the Doctor is written by RTD and Moffat.

claudiaboleyn:

Companion: I am so rubbish. 

RTD-written Doctor: No, you’re not! You’re brilliant! Remember that wonderful thing you did! Remember that special skill you have that nobody else has? Don’t put yourself down! Where would I be without you, eh?

vs

Moffat-written Doctor: You are bossy, also a control freak, a narcissist, a game player, needy, and also your skirt is just a little too tight.

Companion: Excuse me???

I think - for me - Moffat’s Doctor seems to resent his Companions at times. He needs them, but he resents that and he spends his time putting them down so they don’t REALISE he needs them. It makes me sad, because RTD’s Doctors just seemed to be tickled to live in a world that had their companions in it.

  • 26th August
    2014
  • 26
nprbooks:

Image via independent.ie
Today in Book News: The nomadic Irish poet Desmond O’Grady, who had a bit part in Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, has died, The Irish Times reports. O’Grady lived much of his life abroad, in Paris, Italy (where he met Fellini), the U.S. and Egypt. He told an interviewer: “James Joyce left. So I too had to.”
Also today: Kathryn Schulz profiles David Mitchell in New York Magazine: "You could call Mitchell a global writer, I suppose, but that does not quite capture what he is doing. It is closer to say that he is a pangaeic writer, a supercontinental writer. What is for geologists a physical fact — that the world is everywhere interconnected, bound together in a cycle of faulting and folding, rifting and drifting, erosion and uplift — is, for Mitchell, a metaphysical conviction." (See also: NPR’s excerpt of his forthcoming book)
And Jessamyn West defends the most maligned font — Comic Sans.
Read more here.

nprbooks:

Image via independent.ie

Today in Book NewsThe nomadic Irish poet Desmond O’Grady, who had a bit part in Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, has died, The Irish Times reports. O’Grady lived much of his life abroad, in Paris, Italy (where he met Fellini), the U.S. and Egypt. He told an interviewer: “James Joyce left. So I too had to.”

Also today: Kathryn Schulz profiles David Mitchell in New York Magazine: "You could call Mitchell a global writer, I suppose, but that does not quite capture what he is doing. It is closer to say that he is a pangaeic writer, a supercontinental writer. What is for geologists a physical fact — that the world is everywhere interconnected, bound together in a cycle of faulting and folding, rifting and drifting, erosion and uplift — is, for Mitchell, a metaphysical conviction." (See also: NPR’s excerpt of his forthcoming book)

And Jessamyn West defends the most maligned font — Comic Sans.

Read more here.

  • 26th August
    2014
  • 26
  • 26th August
    2014
  • 26

The Last Ship

Ten episodes, a staunch refusal to learn anyone’s name and a dose of the flu that felt like it could be the primeval strain later, The Last Ship has finally hooked me. I care. I even know their names (well, some of them).

'Nathan James, where are you?'

I care what happens to Tom Chandler and his kids, I hope that Granderson Snr (MA in homophobia, PhD in going to the creepy place) gets what is coming to her in spades, I just want to watch Titus Welliver’s face because he’s awesome and I loved him as the Evil Baby turned Smoke Monster (it’s a LIFESTYLE choice, Mother!’) on Lost. I ship Granderson and her platonic bro-crushes on the Captain and XO.

So, thank goodness it’s been renewed. And sorry to other fans, because everything I love on TV dies. Fingers crossed, touch wood, not this time!

  • 26th August
    2014
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    2014
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    2014
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  • 22nd August
    2014
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    2014
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  • 21st August
    2014
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  • 21st August
    2014
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  • 20th August
    2014
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